Spring Inspired Scratchboard Card

   "Every child is an artist.  The problem is how to remain   an artist once we grow up."   -- Pablo Picasso


"Every child is an artist.  The problem is how to remain
an artist once we grow up." -- Pablo Picasso

I love school supplies.  I still get a rush every August when school supply sales are announced.  New paper waiting to be filled with ideas. Pencils begging to be sharpened.  And the best -  a new box of crayons.  Nothing fancy, just a basic box of 24 with primary colors, secondary colors and a few tertiary thrown in for good measure.  Oh, yeah!

MATERIALS

  1. Card (folded) - I chose a light blue-grey card, 5" x 5"
  2. Glue Stick
  3. White card stock
  4. Green card stock
  5. Crayons
  6. Dull pencil
  7. Fiskars® Lever Punch - small butterfly
  8. Fiskars® Lever Punch - medium scalloped circle
  9. Scissors (I used my Wescott Titanium Bonded® pair.)

DIRECTIONS

Select a range of light colors.  Mine were on the warm side, so yellows, pinks, oranges, and reds. Color in a section of the white card stock.  I chose to color randomly, but you can do stripes if you wish.

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 Once you have colored a section of the paper, go over it with a darker tone. I chose a deep blue-violet.

Once you have colored a section of the paper, go over it with a darker tone. I chose a deep blue-violet.

 I liked letting a little color peak through the surface.

I liked letting a little color peak through the surface.

 Punch out a series of scalloped circles and butterflies from your new colorful paper.  I punched 5 circles, but only used 4, and 2 butterflies.

Punch out a series of scalloped circles and butterflies from your new colorful paper.  I punched 5 circles, but only used 4, and 2 butterflies.

 Using a dull pencil, scratch away the dark surface to let the colors below be seen.

Using a dull pencil, scratch away the dark surface to let the colors below be seen.

 With a yellow or light green, color a portion of the green card stock.  When finished, color over it with a dark green.  Cut out stems and leaves with your scissors.

With a yellow or light green, color a portion of the green card stock.  When finished, color over it with a dark green.  Cut out stems and leaves with your scissors.


Arrange the stems, leaves and flower heads on the paper.  Once you have settled on the placement, glue them into place using your gluestick.  

A charming card reminiscent of encaustic painting with nearly limitless color possibilites!

Craft A Terrarium!

   "The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses." --  Hanna Rion

 "The greatest gift of the garden is the restoration of the five senses."
--  Hanna Rion

I moved south to get away from long cold winters, but ever further south I find the winters cold and dreary, though thankfully not as long.  After a few days of gray, I need a bit of outdoor sunshine, so I mad a terrarium, complete with whimsical additions. They are charming and a great project to do with children. They will loved the planting aspect and making little clay or lego figures to set in the landscape.

You will need:
horticultural charcoal
gravel, pepples or marbles
potting soil
fishbowl or glass jar of any size and style
plants of your choice (African violets, ferns, ivy, coleuses, small palms, baby tears, moss or lichens)
decorative pebbles
miniature figurines
small hand trowel
kitchen gloves
scissors
newsprint or brown paper 

Let's create!

1.     Protect your work surface.  Cover your table or counter with paper.  This will not only protect the surface, but make for easier clean up.  While you are at it, protect your hands and put on your gloves.

2.    Clean your jar or bowl in hot, sudsy water and air dry.  I supported my local charity shop by making container purchases there, but you could just as easily raid your recylcle bin.  Mason jars are also a cute touch.

3.   Add a one inch layer of gravel for drainage.  I used glass pebbles, but you could also use small rocks you've collected or even chips of broken crockery.

4.   Add a 1/2 inch layer of horticultural charcoal.  The charcoal pulls the impurities out of the soil and improves drainage.

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5.   Add a 3-4 inch layer of potting soil.  Start fresh with a new bag of potting soil.  Have fun with it.  Make small hills for different viewpoints within your terrarium.  

6.  Planting time!  Arrange your plants in the terrarium until you have a composition you like.  Dig holes in the soil with the trowel (or fingers if your trowel is too large).  Snip off any dead leaves on the plants and then carefully remove them from their pots.  I bought a selection of miniature violets I couldn't resist!  

Free Pattern :: Kidney bean trivet

 I always had a fantasy of being a chef, because I like kitchen life.  -- Geoffrey Rush  

I always had a fantasy of being a chef, because I like kitchen life.  -- Geoffrey Rush
 

moothfoam is great for using as a trivet. The insulating properties of Smoothfoam will protect your kitchen counters from being marked by hot platters of delectables you’ve just fixed.

Supplies:

Smoothfoam 8″ disc
Smoothfoam 1.5″ balls
Aleene’s Turbo Tacky Glue
Dry kidney beans
Foam brush
Dark brown acrylic paint
Golden yellow acrylic paint
Toothpicks
Scrap cardboard
Parchment paper
Hot glue gun

1.  Paint the Smoothfoam disc on all sides with 2 coats of dark brown – use the parchment as a palette. Allow first coat to dry before applying the second.

2.  After the paint is completely dry, glue the kidney beans on one side (the top) of the disc in concentric circles, working from the outer edge toward the center. For variety, I changed the direction of the beans every 3rd row from vertical to horizontal. Allow to dry thoroughly.

3.  Glue rows of beans around the edge of the disc, use the parchment paper as a non-stick work surface. Allow to dry thoroughly.

4.  To create the legs for your trivet, stick a toothpick into each of four Smoothfoam balls to use as a handle while painting them with 3 coats of yellow, allowing each coat to dry thoroughly before proceeding to the next. Poke the balls on toothpicks into a piece of cardboard to dry.

5.  Use hot glue to adhere the four balls onto the back of the disc about 1/2″ in from the edge, at equal distance from each other.

Note: I received payment from Smoothfoam for creating this post.

Finger Knit a Valentine's Day Wreath

 All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt. -- Charles M. Schulz  

All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt. -- Charles M. Schulz
 

You've taken down the Christmas tree and the house is looking a bit sparse.  Well don't fret.  Make a Valentines Day wreath for your front door. This one is  simple.  It requires minimal tools or skills and is kid friendly.

This is essentially a wreath made from one very long strand of finger knit cord. Yes, finger knitting.  Remember doing it in camp or elementary school?  If not check out this video for a refresher.

The tools required are minimal. 

  • yarn - I used one entire skein of Red Heart yarn in a variegated color way. Though a solid hot pink or flame red would be cute too!
  • scissors
  • Smoothfoam 1O" culled wreath
  • ball-head pins
  • pipe cleaner

 

Let's craft.

  1. Begin finger knitting. Finger knit the entire skein into one long rope.
  2. HINT: Or wind off the yarn into smaller balls and have your children finger knit lengths.  Cast off each length. Tie them together.
  3. Tie knots at each end of the rope.  Clip the tail short. Wind the rope into a ball so it stays neat and tangle free.
  4. Pin the end of the tail onto the wreath form. Wind the rope around the wreath. Pinning it in place on the back.
  5. Cover the entire wreath. Pin the other end into place on the back.

 

 

 

    For the knit bow:

    #8 knitting needles
    White worsted acrylic. 
    scissors
    tapestry needle
    Smoothfoam 1O" culled wreath
    ball-head pins
    pipe cleaner

      Knit the Bow.

      Cast on 28 stitches. Proceed to knit in Seed Stitch for 3".


      Seed stitch
      Row 1: * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.
      Row 2: * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.
      Repeat Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.

      Bind off all stitches.   Weave in tails using tapestry needle.

      Cut a 12" length of yarn and wrap it around the center of the knit rectangle to cinch it into a bow. Knot the ends on the back and clip the ends short.

      Pin the bow onto the wreath using matching ball-head pins.

      Slide a pipecleaner under the rope on the back. Pull through and twist ends to form a small loop hanger.

      HINT: If you don't want to knit a bow, just add a large satin ribbon one for a luxurious look. 

       

       

      Christmas Card Photo Cube

       Christmas gives us the opportunity to pause and reflect on the important things around us - a time when we can look back on the year that has passed and prepare for the year ahead. David Cameron

      Christmas gives us the opportunity to pause and reflect on the important things around us - a time when we can look back on the year that has passed and prepare for the year ahead.
      David Cameron

      The holidays have come and gone and now it is time to tidy up after the festivities. I never know what to do with all the Christmas cards, especially those with photos of family and friends. It just doesn’t seem right to toss or even recycle the photos. A Smoothfoam photo cube is the perfect solution. This way I can see the images year ’round on the bookshelves within my office.

      You will need:
      Christmas card photos of family and friends
      3″ Smoothfoam cube
      Washi tape
      Paper trimmer, ruler
      Scissors (look for non-stick blades)
      Tacky glue
      Sequins and sequin pins
      Ball head pins

      Obermeyerphotocube-1024x679.jpg

      Trim your stash of holiday photo cards to 2.75″ squares. Choose your favorite five (no photo for the bottom).

      Center and glue each photo to one side and the top of the cube; allow to dry.

      Frame the photos on each side with 3″ lengths of washi tape, folded over the edges of the cube.

      Pick up a sequin cup, face up, with a sequin pin and push one into each corner of the cube.

      On the bottom of the cube, push a ball-head pin into each corner, angled slightly toward the center of the cube, to act as feet for the photo cube.

      Free Pattern :: Paper Daffodils

        The flower that follows the sun does so even in cloudy days.  --  Robert Leighton   My mailbox is overflowing with catalogs tempting me with beautiful blossoms.  As daylight hours diminish, my thoughts turn to spring.  Daffodils, tulips and hyacinth - this is the time to plant bulbs.  As I can't possibly grow every flower from every catalog in my possession, I decided to make a few daffodils of my own.  Here is a trumpet daffodil, a daffodil with multiple petals, and a classic white narcissus with orange center. I can almost smell their heavenly scent!        Making these flowers is simple with   Sticky Sticks  !  You will need:  3    Sticky Sticks   1   Smoothfoam   2" x 4" x 12" block 2 sheets of cardstock in white, orange and pale yellow scissors or daisy (five petal) die in 3 sizes ( I used an  AccuCut Craft  flower die.) pinking shears glue dots green acrylic paint sponge brush  Let's create!   1.     Paint the Smoothfoam block with 3 layers of green paint  with the sponge brush.  Allow each layer to dry before proceeding to the next.  2.     Cut 2 large flowers using scissors or die cutter in orange, white and yellow.  Cut 2 medium flowers in yellow.  Cut a small flower in white and 2 in orange.

      The flower that follows the sun does so even in cloudy days.  --  Robert Leighton

      My mailbox is overflowing with catalogs tempting me with beautiful blossoms.  As daylight hours diminish, my thoughts turn to
      spring.  Daffodils, tulips and hyacinth - this is the time to plant bulbs.  As I can't possibly grow every flower from every catalog
      in my possession, I decided to make a few daffodils of my own.  Here is a trumpet daffodil, a daffodil with multiple petals, and
      a classic white narcissus with orange center. I can almost smell their heavenly scent!

       

       

      Making these flowers is simple with Sticky Sticks!

      You will need:

      3  Sticky Sticks
      1 Smoothfoam 2" x 4" x 12" block
      2 sheets of cardstock in white, orange and pale yellow
      scissors or daisy (five petal) die in 3 sizes ( I used an AccuCut Craft flower die.)
      pinking shears
      glue dots
      green acrylic paint
      sponge brush

      Let's create! 

      1.     Paint the Smoothfoam block with 3 layers of green paint  with the sponge brush.  Allow each layer to dry before
      proceeding to the next.

      2.     Cut 2 large flowers using scissors or die cutter in orange, white and yellow.  Cut 2 medium flowers in yellow.
       Cut a small flower in white and 2 in orange.

      ©2014Lindsay-Obermeyer-Paper-Flowers.jpg

      3.     Center the blunt end of your Sticky Stick within a petal and gently crease the paper. Do this on all 5 petals for
      both white flower shapes.  I used my finger to make the crease as a bone folder would've made ittoo sharp. (See top left image.)

      4.     Clip tips off of the small orange flower shape with pinking shears.  Fold the petals forward to cfreate "trumpet" effect.

      5.     Center a glue dot in the middle of the first white flower shape, add the second to it.  Add the orange "trumpet."  Now peel
      off the paper of your Sticky Stick and center the flower on it.  Press firmly.  Your first flower is finished!  Make a second with
      the 2 large yellows and the small white.  For the third flower, you will proceed in the same manner with the 2 large oranges and
      2 medium yellows, layering them upon each other before adding the orange "trumpet" and Sticky Stick.

      6.     Push the stick of the orange daffodil into the center of the block.  Push the yellow one into the block to the left of the orange and the
      white one to the right.

      VARIATIONS:   This project lends itself to the classroom.  Each child could make their own flower (without scoring the paper) and add it to the classroom "garden."  Markers are perfect for coloring the Sticky Sticks to add a dash of green if desired. 

      Free pattern :: Snowman Pompom Ornament

       "Some people are born for Halloween, and some are just counting the days until Christmas." --  Stephen Graham Jones  

      "Some people are born for Halloween, and some are just counting the days until Christmas." --  Stephen Graham Jones
       

      That is so me! Yep, Halloween just comes and goes.  The squirrels have already run off with my pumpkin, but that's okay, I can be snug as a bug in my home preparing for Christmas.  I am focusing on decorating a tree with homemade ornaments and as I prepare, I thought I'd share my projects with you.

      This fluffy snowmand is made from two pompoms and hat from a previous project, a ribbon scarf, and button eyes and nose.  "Oh that's really cute, Mom" High praise from my millenial-aged daugther who tends to think I am slightly nuts and is now the family Christmas Scrooge. 

      To make your own:

      You will need:

      White acrylic yarn
      pompom maker (I used this set from Clover.)
      2 small black buttons
      1 small orange button
      12" of ribbon (only 1/2" wide)
      scissors
      tapestry Needle
      hot glue gun
      tweezers
      Hat from previous project

      Make one small and one large pompom following the directions.  Leave the tails used to cinch the pompoms.  

      Cut a 12 inch piece of yarn. Thread your needle.  Pull it through and even. Run the needle up and throught the middle of the smaller pompom and up into and throught the hat's pompom. Knot the ends.

      Now, tie the two pompoms togehter.  Knot the tails.  Trim away the access.

      Trim your snowman. I clipped into the underside of the smaller (head) pompom to obtain more of a "neck."

      Cut a 12" inch piece of ribbon. Tie the ribbon around the "neck" as a scarf.  Trim the ends.

      Hot glue the buttons in place.  Use tweezers to place them or you may burn your fingers. If children are making this project, leave this part for the adults. Hot glue can cause nasty burns.

      A short video from my Periscope for you to follow. 

      Enjoy!  These are cute on the tree. Would be cute attached to a present.  


       

      Free Pattern :: Adorable, Easy, Yarn Hat Ornaments

       “The Christmas tree is a symbol of love, not money. There's a kind of glory to them when they're all lit up that exceeds anything all the money in the world could buy.” -- Andy Rooney

      “The Christmas tree is a symbol of love, not money. There's a kind of glory to them when they're all lit up that exceeds anything all the money in the world could buy.” -- Andy Rooney

      I freely admit. I am morphing into my mother.  She loved Christmas and to make sure she had time to enjoy it even when mad busy with her carering company during the holidays, she would get everything purchased, packed and wrapped by mid-October. No fooling! The Christmas tree went up on or the day after Thanksgiving. I've been thinking about her a lot as she passed away 8 years ago this month.  I'm reading novels set during Christmas. Making ornaments and watching Christmas movies on Netflix.  I'm not crazy, I'm just my mother's daughter. 

      This ornament is super easy and would make a great rainy afternoon craft with the kids to get them in the holiday spirit.  

      For the original introduction of this project on Periscope as part of the PeriGirls Scopetober challenge (I am posting  a new craft project or tip on a daily basis.  You can catch me live and join the converstation on Periscope at 8pm most evenings.  I post under @lbostudio).  

       

      You will Need:

      1 toilet paper roll

      Acrylic yarn (worsted weight, like Red Heart)

      Scissors

      ruler

      Pen

      tapestry needle

      Let's Create!

      Measure your toilet paper tube.  Make a mark at the 1/2 inch mark.  Cut 1/2 inch deep ring from the tube.

      Measure and cut 39 lengths of yarn.  

      Take one piece, fold it in half.  Stick the bent end into the tube and pull the tails through the bent ends loop. Tighten.

      Repeat step 2 until you have completely covered the entire tube.  

      Finger comb the fringe straight.  Cut 2 foot lon legth of yarn.  Wrap it aroun the the fringe 1/2 inch down from the top.  Tighten the wrap and knot it and trim the yarn..  You should now have a fluffy pompom at the top.  Trim your pompom round.  

      cut a 12" piece of yarn. Fold it in half and knot the ends.  Thread your needle with the loop end of the yarn.  Run your needle up inside the hat and throught the pompom, now you have a hanging loop for your ornament.  

      Make dozens of them to create a garland for the doorway or mantle. 

      Free Pattern :: Upcycling a CD into a Woven Coaster

       We live in a disposable society. It's easier to throw things out than to fix them. We even give it a name - we call it recycling. - Neil LaBute

      We live in a disposable society. It's easier to throw things out than to fix them. We even give it a name - we call it recycling. - Neil LaBute

      I don't know about you, but I have dozens of used cd's hanging around my office collecting dust. I used them quite a bit before I bought a flash drive.  Make one mistake with burning your CD and you are left with this shiny plastic circle for what seems an infinity. They have to be shipped off to recycling plants that specialize in recycling cd's.  Well, rather than recycle. Let's upcycle.  The cd makes the perfect base for a woven project.  Teachers - this project will help you to teach fractions and geometry in a fun, hands on way.They also make a great bellringer.  Just pack up each student's weaving in an individual ziplock to grab on their way into the classroom while everyones gets settled and the next lesson begins. It keeps them busy and out of mischief.  Parents - this is a great road trip project!  Just think, the kids could get all their holiday gifts made while quietly working in the car on the family vacation. Win-win!

      All you need:

      1 used cd
      Tapestry needle
      Cotton yarn ( I used leftover sugar 'n cream cotton)
      Leftover bits of yarn from other projects ( Don't knit or crochet, so you don't have leftover yarn, Lion Brand makes little yarn balls of color called Bonbons.  You could also use embroidery floss, though the weaving will take yarn as floss is finer.)
      Scissors
      Ruler

      Start by threading the yarn through the hole and tying it onto the cd, by making a knot. be sure the knot is tied firmly.   Trim off the tail, leaving only about 1/4 inch.

      ©2016Lindsay-Obermeyer-Ucpcyle-CD-Woven-Coaster.png

      Now you are going to warp your cd loom by wrapping thread over the circle.  

      ©2016Lindsay-Obermeyer-Upcycled-Woven-Coaster-CD.png

      Once you have wound the warp around the the cd enough times to cover the center hole, but not so much that the line overlap, you will be ready to start weaving.

      Cut a piece of yarn no longer than 18". Thread it through the needle.  Tie the yarn to the back of the cid.  Attaching it to one of the cotton warp threads.

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      Bring your needle up through the hole to the front and proceed to weave yarn over and under each thread.  Once you've gone full circle, you will continue weaving until you run out of color. 

      ©2016Lindsay-Obermeyr-Woven-Coaster.png

      Bring your needle up through the hole to the front and proceed to weave yarn over and under each thread.  Once you've gone full circle, you will continue weaving until you run out of color. 

      6a00d83451d4c869e201bb08fb0c4a970d-500wi.png

      Continue weaving until you reach the outer edge.  Slide your needle under all your weaving and bring it to the back and tie off.

      ©2016Lindsay-Obermeyer-Woven-Coaster.png

      Weaving was one of my first passions and I actually received a bachelor's degree in weaving. I am so glad to see a resurgence of interest in it.  A few other bloggers to inspire you into weaving at least one cd. 

      Great school display of children's work.

      Make them as dream catchers to decorate a bedroom.

      Weaving becomes a project about unity and variety in terms of art and people.

      Free Pattern :: Knit Cord Coaster- Kid Craft!

       Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home.  --  Magdalena Neuner

      Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home.  --  Magdalena Neuner

      Materials: 

      • Spool knitter with 4 prongs
      • Sport weight yarn (app. 50 yds) - I used Noro's Silk Garden Sock Yarn
      • Tapestry needle
      • Scissors

      Instructions: 

      1. Knit 5 feet of i-cord following the spool knitter directions.Cut a long tail when binding off or start a new yarn. To get started with the spiral, begin by curling and stitching together one end.
      ©2013Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord-Coaster-5-1.jpg

      2.   Continue spiraling and stitching.

      Knit-Cord-Coaster-4.jpg
      Knit-Cord-Coaster-3.jpg

      3.    If you run of yarn to use for stitching, no problem. Simply tie on more, pull the knot tight and sew in the tails.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord2

      4.    Continue spiraling and stitching the cord until you have none left. Add a few extra stitches to secure the end of the i-cord to the body of the spiral. Sew in the tail.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord-Coaster-1.jpg

      Tie Dye Your Yarn

       "The soul becomes dyed with the color of its thoughts." --  Marcus Aurelius

      "The soul becomes dyed with the color of its thoughts." --  Marcus Aurelius

      There are the more commonly known tie dyed t-shirts showing up in every store, as well as those with ombré and shibori patterns. A friend stopped by today and though she would never consider herself trendy, she was wearing a t-shirt with patches of tie dye in shades of indigo.   I had a Tulip tie dye kit from I Love to Create  on hand and decided to give it a go myself, but instead of working with flat fabric, I dyed some cotton yarn.  

      The process couldn't have been simpler.

      You need:

      Tulip Tie Dye Kit
      DK weight 100% cotton yarn (8-16oz)
      acrylic yarn
      scissors
      swift (or a chair)
      plastic wrap
      plastic tarps (I used a plastic pinic table cloth and trash bags)
      bucket
      water
      apron

      If your yarn is in ball form, you will need to make a skein out of it.  To do so, use either a swift and wind it around or turn a chair upside down and wind the yarn in a circle form around the legs.  Once completed tie the ends together.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-yarn.png

      Cut 3 pieces of acrylic yarn.  Each should be 6" long.  Tie them in intervals around the skein.  The key is create a figure 8 at each point which holds the yarn together, yet prevents it from tangling.  Don't pull too tight!

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn

      You should have 4-8 bundles depending on the amount of yarn you had on hand and the size of the skeins you made.

      ©2102Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarns

      To prepare the yarn for maximum absorbtion of the dye, soak it in a bucket of warm water until completely saturated.  

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn

      Cover your work surface with another tarp.  I used trash bags.  Prepare your dye as per instructions in the kit and begin!  

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarnd.png

      Tie dye is a resist method of dying.  Everything under the resists stays the original color while everything else is dyed.  Ikat is a Japanese form a tie dying warps for the loom.  I didn't want to be quite so sophisticated.  I simply squirted the die onto the yarn.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarne.jpg

      I used too much die on my first sample.  The stripes didn't retain their shape, but as I used an analagous color scheme the results were lovely with over over 15 variations of green from spring green to forest green.  (Any other color scheme would have resulted in mud.)  As you can see I experimented.  For my second sample I drizzled blue on the yarn and followed up with dashes of green and yellow.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarnf.jpg
      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn.jpg

      My daughter loves tie dye and I mean loves it. Her 2nd grade birthday party had a tie dye theme and we've even planted roses with variegated flowers said to have a tie dyed look. When she saw me dying the yarn, she grabbed a few t-shirts.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Emily-Tie-Dyed-Shirts.jpg

      I used the Tulip tie dye kit this summer with kids in our circus camp to create clown costumes. Honestly, it was super easy and only moderately messy with 20 children working on them. My suggestion is to have a tarp on the table and on the floor.  Have plastic Ziploc bags ready to go to hold the wet and dyed t-shirts for transfer home to be washed.  

       

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Children.jpg

      Random color fact- The first synthetic dye was mauve.  Until the mid-1860's all colors were derived from natural sources such as indigo, madder, and marigolds.

      Free Pattern :: Peony Wreath Made of Tissue Paper

       "Spring is nature's way of saying, 'Let's party!' " --  Robin Williams

      "Spring is nature's way of saying, 'Let's party!' " --  Robin Williams

      Hello, sunshine!  (I wrote this post 5 years ago on my former blog 🙂). Spring is my favorite season, hands down, no question about it.  I thought I would get a head start with it by making a wreath of peonies.  Around Chicago, these won't be in bloom until June, so I made mine from tissue paper.  It's a great project to do with children! And think of it in the shades of chrysanthemums for a fall-themed wreath!

      Let's Create!

      MATERIALS
      1            pack each of 10 sheets of 20x20 inch tissue paper in red, hot pink, pale pink, white

      1            spool of 26 gauge green wire or 36 green pipe cleaners (chenille)

      1            18" wire wreath frame

      1            1/2 yard of 2" wide green satin ribbon

      1            wire cutters

      1            scissors

       

      DIRECTIONS

      Cut 36 12" pieces of wire or set aside 36 pipe cleaners.

      Open a tissue paper pack,  flatten it out and cut a straight line down the center vertically.  You will now have 20 sheets of paper, each 10" x 20".

      Take the first pile of 10" x 20" paper strips and cut horizontally across the stack every 4".  This will make 100 strips of tissue paper each 4" x 10".  I didn't use a ruler, so some were slightly smaller while others were slightly larger. 

      Repeat the previous step until all the paper is cut.

      Stack 6-10 strips on top of each other.  They can be all one color or two-toned.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer.jpg
      Peony wreath2-1.jpg

      Proceed to fold them into accordion pleats.

      Peony Wreath3.jpg

      Once completed, fold in half like a fan.

      peony wreath4.jpg

      Slip a wire through the center of the fold and twist together.

      peony wreath5.jpg

      Cut a semi-circle around the edge of the open end.

      peony wreath 6.jpg

      Open up one side and smooth it flat as much as possible without tearing the tissue paper.

      peony wreath 7.jpg

      Pull one sheet at a time gently toward the center.

      peony wreath8.jpg

      hen you finish one side, repeat the previous step on the other side.

      Wrap the wire stem around the frame.  

      Continue making flowers and wrapping their stems around the frame until is full.

      If you still have tissue paper remaining after making 36 flowers feel free to make more.  I kept going until my wreath was very "fluffy" and full.  You may like a slightly looser look or want to purchase even more paper to make more flowers.

      Once the wreath is full of flowers, slip the ribbon onto the back of the top of your wreath.  Pull it through until folded in half.

      Cut a V into the ends of the ribbon and tie them together.

      Hang it up and enjoy!

      **  To keep it from quickly fading, do not place it in direct sunlight

      or where it may get wet.  **

      Free Pattern :: Paper Christmas Decoration

        Remember   This December,   That love weighs more than gold!   ~Josephine Dodge Daskam Bacon

      Remember
      This December,
      That love weighs more than gold!
      ~Josephine Dodge Daskam Bacon

      A colorful holiday tree to decorate your sideboard, mantle or dining table.  Use a paper with a holiday print or upcycle from your stash.  This project is easily completed in an afternoon.

      You will need:

      1" diameter circle paper punch
      1" star paper punch
      12" tall x 4" diameter base paper cone
      thick glue (I used Aleene's® Fast Grab Tacky Glue™.)
      scissors
      ruler
      toothpick
      awl
      pencil or pen
      2 sheets of 12" x 12" holiday-themed paper in one print
      1 sheet of holiday-themed cardstock 

      Let's create!

      1. Mark your cone.  Begin by making a mark  1" up from the base of the cone.  Now mark every 3/4" from this mark to the tip.  These marks will be your guide for lining up and overlapping your circles.

      2. Punch circles.  With your ruler, mark 1 1/4"  rows along the back of your holiday-themed paper.  Cut the paper into strips along the lines.  Using your circle punch, cut circles out of the paper strips.

      3. Glue the circles around the cone.  Starting from the base and working your way to the top, glue the circles to the cone.  Add glue only to top underside of the circle.  This will allow the cicles to overlap like scales.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Christmas-Decoration

      4.  Make a star.   Once you've covered your cone with overlapping circles, use your awl to poke a hole at the tip.  Punch out two starts from cardstock.  Add some glue to the center back of one star. Place the toothpick in the glue.  Add the other star.  Allow to dry.  Be sure you glue the backsides of the cardstock together and not the frontsides!  

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Christmas-Craft

      5.  Place the star at the top of the tree.  Push the toothpick into the hole you made at the top of the tree.  Allow only the star to be visible.  If the connection is not secure, add a dab of thick glue and allow to dry.

      If you have seen this post previously, I am transferring posts from my previous blog. If you left a comment and don't see it, they didn't make the transfer, so just leave me a new one!

      Free Pattern :: Mixed Media Christmas Ornaments

        "Gifts of time and love are surely the basic ingredients  of a truly merry Christmas."    --  Peg Bracken

      "Gifts of time and love are surely the basic ingredients
      of a truly merry Christmas."  
      --  Peg Bracken

      My most treasured ornaments are not ones store bought, but those made by family and friends. Pass along the tradition and make a few for yourself and others!  These two "icicles" are easy peasie. Big and bold, they will be add a colorful dash to your Christmas tree.  

      You will need for each:
      Smoothfoam™ 1" ball
      Smoothfoam™ 1.5" ball
      Smoothfoam™ 2" ball
      Smoothfoam™ 3" ball
      Mod Podge®  Matte
      sponge brush
      1 sheet colored tissue paper
      scissors
      hot glue gun
      hot glue sticks
      1" eye pin
      aluminum foil
      8" piece of 1/4" double-faced satin ribbon

      For Blue Icicle you will also need:
      1/2 snowflake paper punch
      1 sheet of glitter paper
      sequins
      straight pins

      For Red Icicle you will also need:
      glue dots in assorted sizes
      fine glitter

      Let's create!

      1.   Hot glue the Smoothfoam™ balls together.  Add a dot to the center of the 3" ball and push the 2" ball in place.  At the opposite side of the 2" ball, add a dot of hot glue and push the 1.5" ball in place. Repeat procedure with the 1" ball.  Allow to cool.

      6a00d83451d4c869e2017d3e992086970c-320wi.jpg

      2.   Cut tissue paper into squares and rectangles of assorted sizes.  They should be no larger than 1" square.

      3.   Pour some Mod Podge®  onto a piece of foil.  Cut a sheet of foil and roll up the sides to make a dish for the Mod Podge®.  Pour in a small amount of Mod Podge™.  Dip your brush into it and paint a thin layer onto the ornament base.  Stick a piece of tissue paper to it and push into place with the brush.  Keep going until the entire ornament base is covered.  You may need a second layer if some areas look thin.

      6a00d83451d4c869e2017ee60ddbea970d-320wi-1.jpg

      4.   Allow ornament base to dry thoroughly.  Place the form on a clean sheet of foil and allow to dry.

      5.   At the top center of the ornament base, push in the eye pin.

      6.   Embellish!

      For Blue Icicle:  Punch out 2 dozen snowflakes.  Pick up a sequin with the straight pin and attach a snowflake to the ornament base.  Cover the entire ornament, leaving some space between each snowflake.

      6a00d83451d4c869e2017d3e993388970c-320wi.jpg

      For Red Icicle:  Add glue dots to the surface of the ornament. Apply larger ones toward the top and small ones at the tip. Shake on glitter.  Brush off excess.

      7.   Tie on the ribbon.  Thread ribbon through the eye, bring ends even and knot together.

      Free Pattern :: Mixed Media Christmas Decoration Using Smoothfoam™

        "Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold,  everything is softer and more beautiful." --  Norman Vincent Peale

      "Christmas waves a magic wand over this world, and behold, 
      everything is softer and more beautiful." --  Norman Vincent Peale

      This is a quick easy project for children of all ages!

      You will need:
      12" x 6" x 1" Smoothfoam™ rectangle
      1 sheet each of emerald green and turquoise blue tissue paper
      1 1/4  yards of emerald green grosgrain ribbon
      18" piece of 20 gauge wire in silver
      8mm sequins in assorted colors
      sequin pins
      small seed beads size 11/0 or 10/0 in assorted colors, including white or silver
      1/2" snowflake punch
      1 sheet 6x6" white glitter paper
      Modge Podge® Matte
      white glue
      sponge brush
      ruler
      pencil
      scissors
      awl / large tapestry needle / skewer
      9"x12" light blue craft felt 

      Let's create! 

      1. Sketch out the tree.  Measure the center of the top of your Smoothfoam™ rectangle. Mark it with your pencil.  Line up your ruler between this mark and the bottom right corner.  Draw a line.  Repeat from the bottom left corner.

      2.  Collage the tree and sky.  Cut each color of tissue paper in half.  You will only need one half of each, so save the rest for another project.  Cut the tissue paper into small rectangles.  Spread a small amount of Modge Podge® Matte onto the tree shape with your sponge brush.  Press green tissue paper into place.  Repeat until entire tree is covered.  Smooth out any wrinkles with the sponge brush.  Allow the green to dry before preceding in the same manner with the blue tissue paper for the sky. Allow the blue to overlap along the sides.  Give a final coat of Modge Podge across the entire surface and allow to dry.

      3.  Trim the tree.  Pick up a bead and then a sequin with one of the pins and push into tree. Continue in this manner until the tree is "decorated."

      4.  Add snowflakes.  Punch 10-14 snowflakes out of the glitter paper.  Pick up a white bead with the pin. Position the snowflake and press the pin through the center.  Push the pin until the bead and snowflake are firmly attached.

      ©2014Lindsay-Obermeyer-Mixed-Media-Christmas-craft

      5.  Add the bow.  Cut the edge of the ribbon on an angle.  Spread a thin amount of white glue along the edge of the rectangle.  Press the ribbon into place. Trim excess ribbon, cutting the edge again on an angle to prevent any possible fraying.  Cut 2" off the remainder.  Form the remainder into a loop and glue the edges together.  Take the 2" section and wrap it over the center of the loop and glue the edges together.  Glue to the center top of the rectangle.  Use a few pins to hold it in place while the glue sets and dries.  Remove pins.

      6.  Cover the back with felt.  Measure and cut a 6" x 12" piece of felt.  Spread a thin amount of glue along the back.  Press felt into place.

      7.  Add the wire hanger.  Wrap the wire around the pencil.  Remove the pencil and spread out the "spring."  Punch holes on each side of the top a 1/2" in from the edge.  Push wire tips into the holes until they are snug.

      Hang your decoration on the wall, a door or set it on a table.  

       

      Free Pattern :: Zippy Knitting Loom Infinity Scarf

        Knitting not only relaxes me, it also bring a feeling of being at home. -- Magdalena Neuner

      Knitting not only relaxes me, it also bring a feeling of being at home. -- Magdalena Neuner

      I have been knitting for 33 years now, once worked for a yarn company,  owned a yarn shop, so I am a bit jaded when it comes to new knitting products, but I tell you I bought myself a zippy loom and have fallen in love with it.  It's a sturdy plastic loom with 4 pegs, but you can buy more to make a longer board or to create a frame with it, so you may easily knit extra bulky hats and afghans.  

      The key to this scarf is drape.  You want to work with bulky yarns that are lightweight such as a traditional "eye-lash " yarn carried with an acrylic. Bulky wools wools won't have the same drape.

      You will need:

      1 ball (135 yd) of Lion Brand Jiffy

      2 balls (57yd) of Lion Brand Fun Fur

      1 Knitting Board zippy Loom

      Tape Measure

      Scissors

      tapestry needle

      The directions for casting on, knitting and casting off are included n the kit and are exactly what I did.  They are straight forward and simple.  To see how to videos and to find other cute quick patterns for the zippy loom.

      If your children have learned to finger knit, then move them forward with knitting using the zippy loom.  Be warned, you will go through quite a bit of yarn, so ask friends if they have any left over bits in their stash that you may use.  Get several boards and make afghans to donate to your local hospital or senior center.  These are warm gifts and if knit in acrylic, for ease of washing, will be an appreciated gift.

      This post is from January 2016. I switched blogging platforms and migrated my most popular posts.   I lost all the comments in the process.  So if you've seen this pattern and made a comment in the past, I do apologize.  Leave me a new one!  As always, if you see an error or have a suggestion, let me know.

      PRINT THIS PATTERN