Free Pattern :: (KAL) Knit along, Knit an afghan one square at a time.

 This stitch lays flat. It is reversible. Great for scarves and edges on garments, like a cuff or collar.  The trick to this stitch is  to knit the purl stitches of the previous row and purl the knit stitches of the previous row. This is a great one for learning to read your stitches.

This stitch lays flat. It is reversible. Great for scarves and edges on garments, like a cuff or collar.  The trick to this stitch is  to knit the purl stitches of the previous row and purl the knit stitches of the previous row. This is a great one for learning to read your stitches.

This is it!  Squee! I am so excited to share a Knit along project with you. I was at Vogue Knitting Live, Chicago 2018 and while listening to a speaker suggest that you buy an extra skein to make a larger swatch than the typical 4"x4". I thought brilliant! Yes, I should do that too, if only to get a better sense of the fabrics drape. So I am setting out to review the basic library of knit purl stitch combinations in a 7"x7" format.  Each square will be collected to make a blanket.  I wanted a project that could be created in small bits as dragging around giant knit projects to the local coffee shop is a tad annoying.  Smaller is also good for summer.  Start now and you could have a 49" x 63" blanket ready to go for next winter.  How cool is that!  

So the way this will work is each Sunday evening at 8pm I will be live streaming on Periscope as @lbostudio. Tune in to watch me.  I will be answering knit questions. Sharing with you what I've learned from 45(!) years of knitting  and working in the industry in various capacities. I've owned a yarn store, was on the board of the yarn trade association, and design for books and magazines.  

I am sorry that the video is cut off.  YouTube gives me  a time limit of 14 minutes of a 23 minute broadcast that I am allowed to upload. You may watch the full replay on Periscope. I will also upload what I can onto YouTube.

I am keeping my palette simple. I am working with just three colors, french blue, cream and camel.  I am using Cascade 220. A nice sturdy basic wool in a worsted weight. To do this for charity, Warm Up America is my charity target.  They ask the rectangles be 7" x 9" and knit in acrylic. So make it in wool for yourself or acrylic for charity, make it in pastels for a baby blanket or two. The project is truly flexible. You could also work with a washable wool.

This is challenging me to think about the basics in groups so that they make sense and you build skills.  Photography is my other challenge.  Not my strength. I prefer to photograph in natural light and there has been rain in my hometown for nearly two weeks solid.  So hopefully as time goes, my photos will improve.  

Let's Knit:

You will need approximately 2000 yards of worsted (#4) yarn. As I am working with Cascade 220  with 220 yards a skein.....  

Basic math:  3 colors 2000/220= approx 9.0909 skeins of yarn. As I am working with 3 colors, that is 3 skeins  of each color.  

Basically you want a worsted yarn that works up to 4 stitches to the inch on an 8 needle.  If you want to destash and mix up yarns, that's fine but stay on gauge.

Afghan / Blanket Size: 49" x 63".  So if you are knitting 7" x 7" squares that will be 63 squares.   Multiply by only 4 squares a week - 16 weeks to complete. Start now to be done by Fall 2018.

If you are knitting 7"x9" rectangles for Warm Up America. that will be 49 rectangles. 4 patterns a week, , 13 weeks to complete. Again Start now to be done by Fall 2018.

10 skeins of Cascade 220. 3 each of French Blue and Camel, 4 of cream
#8 knitting needles
tapestry needle
scissors
measuring tape
Blocking mat
t-pins
Spray bottle with water to block.

Start with the basic Seed Stitch.  When you see *K1,P1* that means work the K1,P1 across the row. 

Work the stitches in order as presented.  They build upon each other.

Have questions? Leave me a comment or reach out on Periscope or Facebook

 The texture is more subtle than seed with the addition of the knit row every other row.  Pin a safety pin to the wrong side of the fabric so you always know which side you are on at a glance.   l presonally love this stitch. It is quick and subtle. Great for jackets and vests. It is not fully reversible.

The texture is more subtle than seed with the addition of the knit row every other row.  Pin a safety pin to the wrong side of the fabric so you always know which side you are on at a glance.   l presonally love this stitch. It is quick and subtle. Great for jackets and vests. It is not fully reversible.

  It sort of looks like Sand.  It doesn't curl. The texture is more subtle.  A great one to work into a fisherman style  or  Guernsey  sweater. 

 It sort of looks like Sand.  It doesn't curl. The texture is more subtle.  A great one to work into a fisherman style  or Guernsey sweater. 

 This one is also called Double Seed stitch.  You can see why as it works up just like seed but everything is doubled.  Another sturdy one that lays flat and is reversible another good choice for a scarf.  I love it in cardigans along the lower 2 inches before I move into stockinette.

This one is also called Double Seed stitch.  You can see why as it works up just like seed but everything is doubled.  Another sturdy one that lays flat and is reversible another good choice for a scarf.  I love it in cardigans along the lower 2 inches before I move into stockinette.

How to block your knit and crochet.

If you have time to knit, if you've taken up knitting, it means you're not worried about the essential stuff.  --- Stephanie Pearl-Mcphee

This video was recorded during a live stream on Periscope. You may hear me talking to someone.  I am able to read peoples comments as I stream.  Part two is below.

The things you will need to properly block a granny square.

A craft blocking board. (They are available at Michaels, Amazon as well as your local yarn store.)
T-pins
Spray bottle
lavender essential oil is optional

I like to add two drops of lavender essential oil to my spray bottle, so when I spray the granny squares, they are lightly protected by moths.  My great grandmother always did this and then redid after every washing.  She never used moth balls and I still have all her crochet work.  I store her zillions of doilies in acid free paper in a cedar chest.  It helps to keep the yarn from yellowing and being eaten by pesky moths.

Granny Square blocking

  • Line up one corner to the edge of one grid.  
  • Pin it on an angle.
  • Line up the edge along the line of the grid.
  • Pin the next corner. 
  • Continue all the way around and then when all 4 corners are secure. Mist the fabric lightly with cool water.  Allow to dry overnight.  Then unpin to easy sew together into a blanket or jacket.

Knit garment pieces work the same way.  And yes it is worth the time to block all your pieces before sewing them together.  

Free Pattern :: Beginner Two Color Cowl

 " Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home. -- "Magdalena Neuner

" Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home. -- "Magdalena Neuner

I loved making this simple slip stitch cowl. It's a great way use up little bits of yarn from previous projects, though in this case I had a couple of packages of Lion Brands BonBons which are 28yd balls of yarn, little fuzzy bits of colorful yumminess. This cowl is knit in the round, but there is no decreasing or switching to double pointed needles. If you are a beginning knitter give this pattern a go for learning to knit in the round and to learn how to work two colors across the fabric.  

Think of the designer fun. Instead of color, work a monochromatic palette from black to light grey.  Or go for a rainbow. Or switch the main color from white to black and add jewel tones for  a semi-stained glass affect. Don't want to sew in ends. Then just use one background color and a variegated yarn. The possibilities for fun are really endless.

This pattern is 27" in circumference. Just big enough to comfortably slide over an adult head and tuck into a coat.  For a child size make it 25".  I tend to add 6" to a an average child's hat circumference of 19" to get  my cowl size.  So adjust accordingly to your needs.

For the 27" circumference you will need:

1 skein of Lion Brand Vanna's Choice in white1 package of Lion Brand Bonbon (I used two packages to get this color shift, but you could use just one.) Or if using up your stash, you 5 colors of 28yds each
26" #9 circular needle
stitch marker
row counter
scissors
tape measure
tapestry needle

Gauge" 16st and 22rows to 4" or 4sts and 5.5rows to 1" in stockinette

Cast on 108 stitches in white. Place stitch marker, join round. Mark each round as completed by counting it on your row/round counter to make it easy to keep track of where you are in the pattern.

©2018Lindsay-Obermeyer-Cowl-Detail.jpg

To read more about slip stitch knitting.

Round 1: Knit one round with the white.
Round 2: With Yellow, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 3: With Yellow, *Purl the yellow knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 4: Knit one round with white.
Round 6: With Yellow, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 7: With Yellow, *Purl the yellow knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 8: With Yellow, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 9: With Yellow, *Purl the yellow knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *.
Round 10: Knit one round with the white.
Round 11: With Light Green, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 12: With Light Green , *Purl the Light green knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 13: Knit one round with the white.
Round 14: With Light Green, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 15: With Light Green , *Purl the Light green knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 16: Knit one round with the white.
Round 17: With Light Green, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 18: With Light Green , *Purl the Light green knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 19: Knit one round with the white.
Round 20: With Light Green, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 21: With Light Green , *Purl the Light green knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *.
Round 22: Knit one round with the white.
Round 23: With Light Green, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 24: With Light Green , *Purl the Light green knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 25: Knit one round with the white.
Round 26: With Turquoise, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 27: With Turquoise , *Purl the Turquoise knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 28: Knit one round with the white.
Round 29: With Turquoise, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 30: With Turquoise , *Purl the Turquoise knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 31: Knit one round with the white.
Round 32: With Turquoise, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 33: With Turquoise , *Purl the Turquoise knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 34: Knit one round with the white.
Round 35: With French Blue, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 36: With French Blue, *Purl the French Blue knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 37: Knit one round with the white.
Round 38: With French Blue, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 39: With French Blue, *Purl the French Blue knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 40: Knit one round with the white.
Round 41: With French Blue, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 42: With French Blue, *Purl the French Blue knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 43: Knit one round with the white.
Round 44: With Sky Blue, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 45: With Sky Blue, *Purl the Sky Blue knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. 
Round 46: Knit one round with the white.

Bind off all stitches loosely. Sew in all ends.

For another of my patterns using two color slip stitch knitting, take a look at this hat pattern.

Please note that Lion Brand and Clover USA provided me with my materials.

Free Pattern: Beyond Beginner Baby Beanie

 Children are the bridge to heaven. -- Persian Proverb

Children are the bridge to heaven. -- Persian Proverb

I continue my series of Patterns for the American Heart Association's charity call "Little Hats, Big Hearts."  This is another beginner basic with a twist.  The beanie is knit in the round using circular needles, but what gives it the twist is the window pane brim knit from a series of slip stitches. If you've been wanting to try fair isle knitting, this is a pattern to get your toes wet.  Once you try this pattern, like a potato chip you will want to make more as the color variations are limitless.  This is sized for a newborn at 14" circumference, but it could be scaled up. 

The brim is a variation of Barbara Walker's Window Pane Stripe pattern.

You will need:

 I used Lion Brand Yarn Vanna's Choice in Red and White
16" #8 circular knitting needles
#8 double point needles
stitch markers
Tapestry needle
tape measure
Scissors

Gauge: 4 stitches and 6 rows per inch.
in Stockinette n the round
Always do a gauge check.

A=Red
B=White

14" (16") hat sizes. 

Round 1: With A, Cast on 56 (64) stitches. Place stitch marker. Join ring.
Round2: Knit all stitches. 
Round 3: Purl all stitches.
Round 4: Repeat Round 2.
Round 5: Repeat Round 3.
Round 6: With B, *Knit1, Bring yarn to back, Slip next stitch* Repeat from * to *
Round 7: With B, *Purl the White knit Stitch, bring yarn to the back, slip the next stitch.*  Repeat from * to *. Switch to A. Carry the non working color on the inside of the hat. Don't pull the tension tight.
Repeat Rounds 2-7 two times.  You should have the stripes of red with white dots.
Repeat Rounds 2-5 with A.
Repeat Round 2-3 with B.
Repeat Rounds 6-7 reversing the colors. 
Repeat Round 2-3 with B.   

Your brim will be 3".

©2018Lindsay-Obermeyer –Window-pane-beanie-little-hats-big-hearts-detail.jpg

 

Cut B.  Leave a 6" tail. Switch to A.

Knit another inch in A. On the last round, place stitch marker  every 7 (8) stitch.  

Begin decreases.
Round 1: knit to stitch marker.Slip stitch marker, K2tog next two stitches. 
Round 2: Knit all stitches.
Repeat Rounds 1 & 2 until only 7(8) stitches remain.  Switch to double point needles when necessary.
Cut a 6" tail. Thread tapestry needle and run the tail through the final 7(8) stitches. Draw it closed.  Weave in all tails.

Now that you've made one for the American Heart Association, try a few colorful variations. Instead of white, try a variegated yarn to see the color flicker around the brim. Or do it in team color so your newborn is Super Bowl ready.

Download the PDF of this pattern.

Free Pattern :: Baby Beanie with a Diagonal Rib

©2018Lindsay-Obermeyer-baby-beanie-little-hate-big-heart.jpg

Sometimes you need a little change.  You've done the basic rib at least a zillion times. So let's shake things up.  This rib travels on the diagonal and is as easy as the basic rib. It has a lovely heavy texture that dresses up any beanie with ease.  This pattern is part of my ongoing series for the American Heart Association project Little Hats Big Hearts. Make one for  the newest member of your family and then make one to donate.

You will need:

 I used  Red Heart Soft in Cherry Red and a variegated for the PomPom.
16" #8 circular knitting needles
#8 double point needles
stitch markers
Tapestry needle
tape measure
Scissors
pompom maker (I use on from Clover).

This one was designed for a baby at 16" in diameter.

Gauge: 4 stitches and 6 rows per inch.
in Stockinette n the round
Always do a gauge check.

Stitches: 3x3  Diagonal Rib in the round.
Round 1:  *P3,K3*; Rep from * to *.  End with a  1K stitch past the stitch marker.
Round 2: *P3,k3,*  Rep from *to*. End with  2K stitches past the stitch marker
.
Round 3: *P3,k3,*  Rep from *to*. End with  3K stitches past the stitch marker.
Repeat Rounds 1-3 for desired length.
This creates a diagonal shifting of the rib.  This rib will add some lovely texture at the brim.

©Lindsay-Obemeyer-baby-beanie-little-hats-beig-hearts.jpg

 

Let's Knit

Cast on 65 stitches.
Place a stitch marker. Join circle.

  1. Start knitting the 3x3 Rib.  Continue in this pattern for 2 inches ending with round 3.  
  2. Switch to Stockinette. Work in Stockinette (which in the round is just knitting) for 2.5 inches.
  3. When you have knit 4.5 inches from the beginning, K2Tog before the stitch marker, for a total of 64 stitches. Place a stitch marker after every 8 stitches.
  4. Begin decreases. 
  5. Round 1 Decreases: K2Tog before every stitch marker.
  6. Round 2 Decreases: Knit.
  7. Repeat this round sequence (5 and 6) until only 8 stitches remain. Switch to double point needles when necessary.
  8. Cut yarn leaving a 6 " tail.  Thread tapestry needle an run the tail through the final 8 stitches. Draw it closed.  Weave in all tails.
  9. Make a PomPom and sew it to the top of the beanie.

Download this patttern.

Dress to Kilt : Chanel pre-Fall 2013, Knitwear Fabulous

 "Doing collections, doing fashion is a non-stop dialogue." -- Karl Lagerfeld

"Doing collections, doing fashion is a non-stop dialogue." -- Karl Lagerfeld

Be still my tartan and fair isle heart!  Karl Lagerfeld's pre-Fall 2013 collection for Chanel was outstanding, it is hands down still my favorite couture collection. Very wearable but with interesting twists.  I'm a Lindsay with ties to Clan Lindsay, so maybe I'm genetically programmed to love this look, but really, can you blame me? The layers of knit and wool fabrics are winter perfect. And all those details...swoon! May I please have that ruff?  And that orange scarf

Chanel 2013.jpg

Finger Knit a Valentine's Day Wreath

 All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt. -- Charles M. Schulz  

All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt. -- Charles M. Schulz
 

You've taken down the Christmas tree and the house is looking a bit sparse.  Well don't fret.  Make a Valentines Day wreath for your front door. This one is  simple.  It requires minimal tools or skills and is kid friendly.

This is essentially a wreath made from one very long strand of finger knit cord. Yes, finger knitting.  Remember doing it in camp or elementary school?  If not check out this video for a refresher.

The tools required are minimal. 

  • yarn - I used one entire skein of Red Heart yarn in a variegated color way. Though a solid hot pink or flame red would be cute too!
  • scissors
  • Smoothfoam 1O" culled wreath
  • ball-head pins
  • pipe cleaner

 

Let's craft.

  1. Begin finger knitting. Finger knit the entire skein into one long rope.
  2. HINT: Or wind off the yarn into smaller balls and have your children finger knit lengths.  Cast off each length. Tie them together.
  3. Tie knots at each end of the rope.  Clip the tail short. Wind the rope into a ball so it stays neat and tangle free.
  4. Pin the end of the tail onto the wreath form. Wind the rope around the wreath. Pinning it in place on the back.
  5. Cover the entire wreath. Pin the other end into place on the back.

 

 

 

    For the knit bow:

    #8 knitting needles
    White worsted acrylic. 
    scissors
    tapestry needle
    Smoothfoam 1O" culled wreath
    ball-head pins
    pipe cleaner

      Knit the Bow.

      Cast on 28 stitches. Proceed to knit in Seed Stitch for 3".


      Seed stitch
      Row 1: * K1, p1; rep from * to end of row.
      Row 2: * P1, k1; rep from * to end of row.
      Repeat Rows 1 and 2 for pattern.

      Bind off all stitches.   Weave in tails using tapestry needle.

      Cut a 12" length of yarn and wrap it around the center of the knit rectangle to cinch it into a bow. Knot the ends on the back and clip the ends short.

      Pin the bow onto the wreath using matching ball-head pins.

      Slide a pipecleaner under the rope on the back. Pull through and twist ends to form a small loop hanger.

      HINT: If you don't want to knit a bow, just add a large satin ribbon one for a luxurious look. 

       

       

      Free Pattern :: Beginner Baby Beanie

       A baby is God's opinion that life should go on. -- Carl Sandburg

      A baby is God's opinion that life should go on. -- Carl Sandburg

      The American Heart Association has a call out for hand knit or crocheted Baby hats to  inspire moms to take their family’s heart health to heart while also raising awareness about Congenital Heart Defects.  They are taking hats through February. Chapters around the country are participating. As someone who has had a stroke and various heart issues. You could say that this project strikes close to the heart. I am posting at least one new baby hat pattern per week. These are mostly basis patterns with the beginner in mind.  To learn more about this project watch the following video.

      This particular pattern is perfect for the knitter who claims "I only know how to knit a scarf."  Okay, if you can knit a scarf, you can knit a hat!

      You will need:

       I used a Red Heart Soft in  White and a Cherry Red
      Size 8 knitting needles
      Tapestry needle
      tape measure
      pins
      pompom maker (I use on from Clover).

      This one was designed for a newborn at 14" in diameter.

      Gauge: 4 stitches and 6 rows per inch.
      Always do a gauge check.

      Stitches: 2x2 rib:
      Row 1: *K2,P2* and repeat from * to * ending with a P2.
      Row 2 - 6: same as Row 1.

      Stockinette:
      Knit all the stitches and then purl all the stitches on the next row. Repeat. Knit a row, purl a row.
       

      Cast on 28 stitches using the long tail method. Leave a 12" tail.

      Row 1: *K2,P2* and repeat from * to * ending with a P2.  Work this repeat pattern known as a 2x2 rib for 1 inch.

      Once you have finished the rib, you are to continue in stockinette for the next 10 inches.  

      Complete the last inch in 2x2 rib.

      You should now have a "scarf" that is 12" long and 7" wide.
      Cast off all stitches. Leave a long tail.

      It will be easier to seam up the edges if you first block the fabric.

      ©2018Lindsay-Obermeyer-blocking.jpg

      I do much of my blocking on my ironing table. I purchased a cover with a 1x1" grid specifically for this purpose.  Pin the fabric down, stretching it to its full width. Once all the edges are pinned. Mist with cool water.  Allow to thoroughly dry.  As you can see I left long  tails.

      Fold the fabric in half and pin the edges and sew it up using the Mattress stitch.

      ©2018Lindsay-Obermeyer-hat-seaming.jpg

      Once I have seamed up both edges using the tails. I sew in all ends. 

      Make 2 large white pompoms.  Attach them to the corners.  

      I would love to see your final creation. I started a charity knitting group.  Please join the fun and share your project in progress. Ask questions.  Add links to your favorite patterns.  

      Costumes :: Snow Queen

       Springtime is the land awakening.  The March winds are the morning yawn.  -- Lewis Grizzard 

      Springtime is the land awakening.  The March winds are the morning yawn. 
      -- Lewis Grizzard 

      Last summer during a blistering heat wave, I made a garment inspired by Hans Christian Anderson's story "The Snow Queen."  The top is knit from Lion Brand's Vanna's Glamour®.  It's a lovely yarn to work with and adds this gorgeous shimmer that shifts with the light - perfect for my Snow Queen Dress. Having recently invested in a large die cutter, I decided to put it to the test.  I cut a 100+ cardboard snowflakes which I then embellished.  Naturally, no two snowflakes are the same.  I painted, rubber stamped and colored with pencil and pen. I glued on sequins, wrapped threads and added small sparkling stickers.  The skirt (originally the underskirt to a bridal dress) became an experiment in how far I could push a mixed media approach.  

      ©2013Lindsay-Obermeyer-Snow-Queen.jpg

      I finally got around to getting the work professionally photographed.  Larry Sanders is a genius at photography. He knows exactly how to light my work to capture it at the best possible vantage.  It was a big photo shoot lasting nearly 8 hours as I had so much work to be photographed.  I love being able to step back and take a more neutral look at what I've created.  

      ©2013Lindsay-Obermeyer-Larry-Sanders.jpg

      These same snowflakes would make a great garland for the mantel or as ornaments to decorate a Christmas tree. 

      video love :: on handwork and why we need it

      "Quiet the mind, and the soul will speak."  -- Ma Jaya Sati Bhagavati

      A former student recently reconnected and sent me this lovely video.  I had to share it with you. Enjoy.

      Renate Hiller speaks beautifully as to why the crafts, in particular the fiber arts, are an integral part of our development as children and how they reflect the very nature of our cosmos.  I am not a spinner, but she has me wanting to pull out my drop spindle.   

      video love :: Madga Sayeg, installation knit artist, yarn bomber extraordinaire

      Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. - Steve Jobs

      Madga Sayeg.  You may not know her name, but if you're a knitter, I bet you are familiar with at least one of her works of art.  This short video interview by the Wall Street Journal is so inspiring.  I can certainly identify with how she talks about a small idea turnin big, going viral and becoming something outside of yourself.  My Red Thread Project® started as a double dare from a curator to see if I could find a meaningful way to connect a university to the local town.  7,000 handknit hats later with emails from reporters worldwide, full samba bands and teaching over 1,000 children how to knit, the project cease to be an idea and took on its on reality.  In other words, when you have an idea - go for it!

      Free Pattern :: The Quick Knit Cowl

       “Properly practiced, knitting soothes the troubled spirit, and it doesn't hurt the untroubled spirit either.”  -- Elizabeth Zimmermann

      “Properly practiced, knitting soothes the troubled spirit, and it doesn't hurt the untroubled spirit either.”  -- Elizabeth Zimmermann

      This is it.  The ultimate in cozy quick knit gifts.  I tend to measure time to knit required by my Netflix binging, so this took 2.5 episodes of Gilmore Girls to complete, so in real time about 2.5 hours.

      I rank this project as beginners. Super easy. Yes, you can do it. Get your yarn now and knit one for everyone on your gift list by the end of your Thanksgiving break! Seriously!

      You will need:

      2 skeins of Lion Brand Yarns Color Clouds Yarn (55yd /50m)
      10.5 knitting needles
      Tapestry needle
      Tape measure
      scissors
      3 large buttons
       

      Gauge: 1.5 sts to the inch. 

      Seed Stitch:
      Row 1: *K1, P1* repeat across the row.   
      Row 2: Repeat Row 1.
      Continue repeating Row 1 and 2

      Cast on 13 stitches.  Begin knitting in Seed Stitch pattern. Continue working in Seed stitch for 31 ". 
      Last 9 rows:
      Row 1: Knit
      Row 2: Purl
      Row 3: K3,YO1,K3YO1,K3,YO1,K4
      Row 4: Purl - remember to purl the YO1. (These make the button holes.)
      Row 5-9: Knit.

      Finished length will be 34".

      Sew in all tails.

      Sew buttons into place.  You get different looks based on where you place them. Mine are sewn along one edge, 2" up from the bottom. Be sure button holes line up with the buttons.

      Print this pattern

       

      Super quick DIY Gift :: Hand-Knit or Crochet a Bookmark

       "Handmade presents are scary because they reveal that you have too much free time." -- Douglas Coupland

      "Handmade presents are scary because they reveal that you have too much free time." -- Douglas Coupland

      Well, Christmas is in less than a month and you need a quick gift.  You like to personalize what you give.  A book is a great gift, but you can make it stellar with a hand-knit or crocheted bookmark. These are super simple, beginner basic and will take less than one hour each.

      DSC_1659.jpg

      To make the knitted one with the button -

      You will need: 

      Patons Grace Cotton
      size 4 knitting needles
      tapestry needle
      scissors
      button
       

      Cast on 55 stitches. Work in Seed Stitch. Continue working in seed stitch until you've knitted an inch. Bind off all stitches. Sew in the ends with a knitting needle.  Stitch on a large button. This tagua nut one is from a friend's company - One World Button Supply Co.  Lucky me to have such a friend, she sent me a box of buttons for Christmas one year.  I love each of them.  You may want to block your bookmark or iron it lightly with a steam iron. This will make it look crisper.

      The crochet one is nearly as simple:

      Patons Grace Cotton
      Size B crochet hook.
      tapestry needle
      scissors

      Chain 50.  Turn and work a DC into each chain. *Chain 2 at end of row, Turn and work a DC into each stitch.*  Work from * to * for one more row.  Then turn and work a row of scalloped stitches. Make 1ch, 1sc into first st * Miss skip 1, 7DC into next stitch, skip 1, 1sc into next st ** repeat from * to **.  Cut thread, pull through last loop, sew in all tails.  Again, press or block. 

      Snowman Knit Hat

       "Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather. " -- John Ruskin

      "Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather. " -- John Ruskin

      It may be early November, but I am ready for Christmas!  Well, I am trying to get ready.  For me it's all about the anticipation.  With the temperatures having recently dropped, I've been thinking about snow. What fun to wear a Frosty the snowman hat.  The brim is rolled up in the photo. My daughter tends to do her own styling when she models for me. She felt the 21" hat was a bit big on her and wanted a firmer fit. I should have made her the 19" hat.

      I've written this pattern to fit many sizes.  I was thinking of making one to her size request so we get a cute Christmas photo! 

      Infant (toddler, child/youth, adult)

      Sizes are for 16”(18”, 19”, 21”) ( for a really custom fit, go to this pattern)

      Gauge: 4sts and 6 rows to the inch.  Check your gauge to have a truly fitting hat.

      HINT: If you have too many sts to the inch. Go down  a needle size. If too few, go up a needle size.

      This pattern is not written for straights. 

      You will need:

      1 skein of white worsted yarn approx 130-180yds pending on size – I used Red  Heart in the sample.

      #8 16” circular knitting needles

       #8 double point knitting needles

      two large black buttons

      1smaller orange button

      1 yard of red worsted  yarn

      tapestry needle

      scissors

      stitch markers

      tape measure

      Sewing thread.

      Sewing needle.

      For Pompom –

      Pompom maker (large)

      Black worsted yarn

      scissors

      2x2 rib – *K2,P2*, repeat  around , end with a P2 at stitch marker. Repeat for the next round until you have knit 1 inch.

      Cast on 64(72,80,88) stitches onto the circular needles. Join circle. Add stitch marker. Knit in a 2x2 rib for one inch.

      Now just knit each round until your crown from beginning to top measures 4”. On this last round at a stitch marker every 8 stitches.

      Begin decreases.

      Round 1: *Knit to stitch marker. Slip the stitch marker.  K2tog.* Repeat from * to * until you finish the round.

      Round 2: Just knit this entire round.

      Continue working decreases. Switch to double points when it is too tight to work the decreases on the circular needles.

      Continue working the decreases until just 8 stitches remain.

      Cut yarn leaving a 6” tail.  Thread tapestry needle with tail. Run tail through the remaining stitches. Cinch it tight.  Sew in all ends.

      Make a black pompom.  Sew it onto the hat.

      Using sewing needle and thread sew on the buttons.

      Using red worsted yarn and the tapestry needle, carefully embroider on the mouth. Don’t pull stitches tight.  Sew in tails.

      If you try this, please post a family pic on my Facebook page. I'd love to see it! And as always, if you have a question, feel free to contact me.

      To download and print this pattern, click here.

      Beginner's Quick Knit Shawl

       This is a stock photo by Guilia Bertelli from Unsplash.  The featured Shawl is being blocked since broadcast and then must be photographed. Blogging and Scoping is a process.

      This is a stock photo by Guilia Bertelli from Unsplash.  The featured Shawl is being blocked since broadcast and then must be photographed. Blogging and Scoping is a process.

      Welcome.  This is the pattern for the shawl featured in my November 7th Scope on Periscope. 

      You can catch the taping here on my Youtube channel. 

      You will need:

      1 skein of worsted yarn
      #8 knitting needles (or needles for guage of 4 stitches to the inch).
      scissors
      Tapestry needle.

      This pattern is for a basic bias knit shawl with eyelets running along the edges. 

      Cast on 4 stitches.

      Knit one row.

      *Turn and K2, YO, knit across the rest of the stitches*. Repeat from * to* until you have 5o stitches on the needle and what looks like half a square.  if you want it bigger, that's fine Keep going until the desired width is achieved.

      Next row* K1, K2tog YO, K2tog, Knit across the rest of the stitches.* Repeat from * to * until you are back to just 4 stitches.  You will end up back with just 4 stitches.  Bind off final 4 stitches.

      These directions are tried and true. The pattern will work up quickly. Consider it a weekend or two weekend project depending on how fast you knit.  I don't recommend trying to speed up the process by using a bulky yarn as the drape won't be fluid.  

      For the dishcloth pattern that this is based upon click here.

      To download and print this pattern, click here.

      Free Pattern :: Knit Cord Coaster- Kid Craft!

       Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home.  --  Magdalena Neuner

      Knitting not only relaxes me, it also brings a feeling of being at home.  --  Magdalena Neuner

      Materials: 

      • Spool knitter with 4 prongs
      • Sport weight yarn (app. 50 yds) - I used Noro's Silk Garden Sock Yarn
      • Tapestry needle
      • Scissors

      Instructions: 

      1. Knit 5 feet of i-cord following the spool knitter directions.Cut a long tail when binding off or start a new yarn. To get started with the spiral, begin by curling and stitching together one end.
      ©2013Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord-Coaster-5-1.jpg

      2.   Continue spiraling and stitching.

      Knit-Cord-Coaster-4.jpg
      Knit-Cord-Coaster-3.jpg

      3.    If you run of yarn to use for stitching, no problem. Simply tie on more, pull the knot tight and sew in the tails.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord2

      4.    Continue spiraling and stitching the cord until you have none left. Add a few extra stitches to secure the end of the i-cord to the body of the spiral. Sew in the tail.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Knit-Cord-Coaster-1.jpg

      Tie Dye Your Yarn

       "The soul becomes dyed with the color of its thoughts." --  Marcus Aurelius

      "The soul becomes dyed with the color of its thoughts." --  Marcus Aurelius

      There are the more commonly known tie dyed t-shirts showing up in every store, as well as those with ombré and shibori patterns. A friend stopped by today and though she would never consider herself trendy, she was wearing a t-shirt with patches of tie dye in shades of indigo.   I had a Tulip tie dye kit from I Love to Create  on hand and decided to give it a go myself, but instead of working with flat fabric, I dyed some cotton yarn.  

      The process couldn't have been simpler.

      You need:

      Tulip Tie Dye Kit
      DK weight 100% cotton yarn (8-16oz)
      acrylic yarn
      scissors
      swift (or a chair)
      plastic wrap
      plastic tarps (I used a plastic pinic table cloth and trash bags)
      bucket
      water
      apron

      If your yarn is in ball form, you will need to make a skein out of it.  To do so, use either a swift and wind it around or turn a chair upside down and wind the yarn in a circle form around the legs.  Once completed tie the ends together.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-yarn.png

      Cut 3 pieces of acrylic yarn.  Each should be 6" long.  Tie them in intervals around the skein.  The key is create a figure 8 at each point which holds the yarn together, yet prevents it from tangling.  Don't pull too tight!

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn

      You should have 4-8 bundles depending on the amount of yarn you had on hand and the size of the skeins you made.

      ©2102Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarns

      To prepare the yarn for maximum absorbtion of the dye, soak it in a bucket of warm water until completely saturated.  

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn

      Cover your work surface with another tarp.  I used trash bags.  Prepare your dye as per instructions in the kit and begin!  

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarnd.png

      Tie dye is a resist method of dying.  Everything under the resists stays the original color while everything else is dyed.  Ikat is a Japanese form a tie dying warps for the loom.  I didn't want to be quite so sophisticated.  I simply squirted the die onto the yarn.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarne.jpg

      I used too much die on my first sample.  The stripes didn't retain their shape, but as I used an analagous color scheme the results were lovely with over over 15 variations of green from spring green to forest green.  (Any other color scheme would have resulted in mud.)  As you can see I experimented.  For my second sample I drizzled blue on the yarn and followed up with dashes of green and yellow.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarnf.jpg
      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Yarn.jpg

      My daughter loves tie dye and I mean loves it. Her 2nd grade birthday party had a tie dye theme and we've even planted roses with variegated flowers said to have a tie dyed look. When she saw me dying the yarn, she grabbed a few t-shirts.

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Emily-Tie-Dyed-Shirts.jpg

      I used the Tulip tie dye kit this summer with kids in our circus camp to create clown costumes. Honestly, it was super easy and only moderately messy with 20 children working on them. My suggestion is to have a tarp on the table and on the floor.  Have plastic Ziploc bags ready to go to hold the wet and dyed t-shirts for transfer home to be washed.  

       

      ©2012Lindsay-Obermeyer-Tie-Dye-Children.jpg

      Random color fact- The first synthetic dye was mauve.  Until the mid-1860's all colors were derived from natural sources such as indigo, madder, and marigolds.

      Free Pattern :: Quick knit Beret

       Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. -- Albert Camus

      Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower. -- Albert Camus

      I love knitting small projects in anticipation of the next polar vortex.  Small projects are easy to toss in the car for the family road trip or create while Netflix binge-watching. I often take them with me to work up while at my local coffee shop.  This beret takes just one skein of Lion Brands Amazing Yarn.  Yep, just one skein of the yarn and you can knit this rocking beret and flirt your way through winter!  This project first appeared in the Bella Crafts Quarterly, which if you don't know it is a great free craft magazine.

       

      Hey, Lindsay, I want to knit that!

      ©2014Lindsay-Obermeyer-free-pattern-knit-beret

      Free Pattern :: Knit a Heart Pocket Warmer

      ©2015Lindsay-Obermeyer-knit-heart-pocket-warmer

      Valentines Day is my favorite holiday.  What's not to love about all the red, pink, lace and chocolate, let alone celebrating the act of love and loving?  As a relaunch my blog this year after my year of health disasters, I am dedicating this coming month to not only heart-related craft projects but also heart healthy recipes and all things red.If you've been following this blog for some time, then you know that last February I had a stroke.  And in October I had a heart attack.  I am now in cardio rehab, trying to get stronger.  Eating a Mediterranean, heart healthy diet is important as is getting plenty of sleep and exercise.  I've been eating a mostly organic vegetarian diet for 25 years. I never smoked and I drink little ( now not at all).  I walked a mile a day and did pilates twice a week.  So what the heck happened??? Genetics.  There is a strong strain of cardio vascular disease on my maternal side of the family, plus auto immune disease.  I can't negate my genetics, but I am hell bent to neutralize it.  So I eat healthily, get lots of sleep, try to de-stress my life, and now go three times a week for 2 hours a day to cardio rehab.  The cardiovascular disease kills more woman per year than all the cancers combined.  Think about it.  Pretty darn scary.  Scarier yet is that strokes are the leading cause of disability in this country.  Don't let it happen to you!  Please!  Take it from me, stroke and heart attacks suck! If your doctor says, no more smoking, then learn to quit.  Don't roll your eyes at your doctor.  You could end up in a coma in bed for the rest of your life. Sure there is the quality of life vs quantity, but is being in a permanent coma really worth the cigarettes or extra order of fries?  I'm not saying go crazy, just try to start modifying your habits to become healthier.  End of sermon.

      The project above is one I designed for eHow.com.  It's a hand knit hand warmer to tuck in your pocket to keep your hands warm while you are in the park taking a walk.  Though if you do have heart disease - stay indoors and walk your local mall to stay warm.  I designed it to keep my daughter's hands warm while waiting for the bus.

      Valentines Day is my favorite holiday. If you followed my previous blog, from which this post has been copied.  You know that in February 2014. I had a stroke.  And in October I had a heart attack.  I dutifully attended cardio rehab, and continually get stronger.  Eating a Mediterranean, heart healthy diet is important as is getting plenty of sleep and exercise.  I've been eating a mostly organic vegetarian diet for 25 years. I never smoked and I drink little.  I walked a mile a day and did pilates twice a week.  So what the heck happened??? Genetics.  There is a strong strain of cardio vascular disease on my maternal side of the family.  I can't negate my genetics, but I am hell bent to neutralize it.  So I eat healthily, get lots of sleep, try to de-stress my life, and now walk every day and go to the gym three times a week for at least 2 hours. Cardiovascular disease kills more woman per year than all the cancers combined.  Think about it.  Pretty darn scary.  Scarier yet is that strokes are the leading cause of disability in this country.  Don't let it happen to you!  Please!  Take it from me, stroke and heart attacks suck! If your doctor says, no more smoking, then learn to quit.  Don't roll your eyes at your doctor.  You could end up in a coma in bed for the rest of your life. Sure there is the quality of life vs quantity, but is being in a permanent coma really worth the cigarettes or extra order of fries?  I'm not saying go crazy, just try to start modifying your habits to become healthier.  End of sermon.

      The project above is one I designed for eHow.com.  It's a hand knit hand warmer to tuck in your pocket to keep your hands warm while you are in the park taking a walk.  Though if you do have heart disease - stay indoors and walk your local mall to stay warm.  I designed it to keep my daughter's hands warm while waiting for the bus. It's a quick knit and a great gift to make.  And what I find amazing in transferring my blog over is to realize that I designed and posted this post just one year after my stroke! 😎

       

       

      Free Pattern :: Fingerless Mittens on Two Needles

      ©2015Lindsay-Obermeyer-Fingerless-Mittens-Two-Needle-Ehow

      I prefer winter and Fall, when you feel the bone structure of the landscape — the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter. Something waits beneath it, the whole story doesn’t show. ~Andrew Wyeth

      While I understand the sentiment, I can't agree.  I hate winter.  I don't like to be cold or the feel that annual ache I get in my fingers.  Well this year, I decided to be proactive and made myself a pair of fingerless mittens that may be worn indoors or out. They are perfect for when you need to send a quick text and not freeze while waiting for the bus.  I designed them for eHow.com with the beginning knitter in mind.  They are designed to be knitted up on straight needles rather than the usual double points. But then if you are like me and prefer knitting in the round, you could bits in the round, convert back to straight for the thumb gusset if you've never made one and then zip back to double points.  Enjoy!